I received an awesome t-shirt in the mail from the “Cats against Clay” campaign.

The accompanying letter was from “Francine” the matriarch of this rebel group of cats.

dear enlightened human,
your feline companion has informed us of your support in the cats against clay (cac) effort. on behalf of cac, i would like to express my gratitude. with your help and support, hopefully we can eliminate the icky, harmful clay that has infested our litter boxes for far too long.

please accept this cac t-shirt as a token of our appreciation and wear it proudly to show your continued support of our case. as we cannot speak human words, we really need your help to spread our message. the time has finally come for your kind and ours to united together. we will share with others the dangers of clay litter. cac is confident we will soon see the day when clay litter will be a thing of the past.

Although we do have a litter-box for those rainy days or just-in-case times, our cats are house trained like dogs. They are allowed outside during the daylight hours and they spend the time sleeping or just exploring the yard. Spanky, our resident bad-boy-film-star does get itchy feet from time to time (somehow, it always happens around a full moon) and we’ll see him slinking along the sidewalk and headed up the street to pick a fight with a neighbor’s cat.

Because we live on a street where it’s just not safe for animals (and humans) to be out past a certain time, the rule is that all cats must come in the house at night. So the cats have learned to do their business before coming in and then, when let out in the morning, they can go and use the ground again. It works great for us because frankly, cleaning the litter box is not a favorite chore… y’think?

Power to the Pawpulace!

Some links:

The main “Cats against Clay” site – http://www.catsagainstclay.org/
Their Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/pages/Bad-Kitty/111314825552200?ref=ts

Read a well-balanced article about clay litters and alternatives:
http://cats.about.com

Green Little Cat has a great article about why she switched to more sustainable clay. On there, she shares this statement: Worldwise, a company that makes sustainable pet products writes that, “Each year over 2 million tons of cat litter, or approximately 100,000 truckloads, ends up in landfills in the U.S. alone.”
Read more at: Green Little Cat – http://www.greenlittlecat.com/?p=13

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Jordanne grew up as a farm girl living in the most unlikely of places -- the concrete jungle sprawl of Los Angeles. She lives on the Urban Homestead where she shares her life with a wacky and always entertaining menagerie of goats, ducks, chickens, cats, bees, and stray animals that land up on her porch. Her passions are the natural and sustainable care of animals and her knowledge lies in successfully integrating "farm" animals into the city lifestyle. Jordanne also contributes to her family's blog called Little Homestead in the City -- chronicling this bizarre, beautiful, and often hilarious journey they're on.

8 COMMENTS

    • I love this!

      We use hay for our feathered friends though. I think it would be rather difficult to convince the kitties to do likewise. lol

  1. Our cats are indoor only because we live on a really busy street and are surrounded by cat aggressive dogs. We use pine litter, which we love. The poo goes into our composting can (for dog and cat waste) which works like a household septic system. The litter then gets to go into one of our compost piles.

  2. We use wood pellets. We have a pellet stove (sometimes these are called biomass stoves) that is our primary heat source in the winter, so we had the pellets kicking around. I looked at them one day, and thought, “Why, these look like Feline Pine!” And they are the same, just much cheaper. The pellets here sell for $3.50-$5.00 for a 40# bag. Some companies sell their pellets as “fuel and-or pet litter/bedding”. The pellets are made from sawdust that would otherwise be wasted, bound together with gum made from tree sap and extruded. They compost and burn beautifully. Since we made the switch, we have converted four adult cats and they all have done just fine. I think the box smells better than with clay litter, and it is FOR SURE easier to scoop.

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